• Tilney All Saints Church

    Aerial view of Tilney All Saints Church © Steve Lyden 2012

  • Church Road

    Aerial view of Church Road, Tilney All Saints © Steve Lyden 2012

  • Eagles Golf Club

    Aerial view of Eagles Golf Club, School Road, Tilney All Saints © Steve Lyden 2012

  • Eagles Golf Course

    Aerial view of Eagles Golf Course, Tilney All Saints © Steve Lyden 2012

  • The Old Hall

    Aerial view of The Old Hall, off Station Road, Tilney All Saints © Steve Lyden 2012

  • Bury Manor ruins

    Aerial view of Bury Manor ruins, Tilney All Saints © Steve Lyden 2012

  • Shepherdsgate Road

    Aerial view of Shepherdsgate Road, Tilney All Saints © Steve Lyden 2012

Tilney - what's in a name?

 

The following is a quote from our 2011 book, 'Tilney All Saints in Living Memory REVISED' :

The name ‘Tylney’ or ‘Tilney’ possibly originates from an Anglo-Saxon word (or name) brought by the Frisians from the south-east corner of the North Sea, plus the suffix ‘ey’ which means ‘island’, hence ‘Island of Tiln’. Historians seem confident that the original Tilney family took the name from the area rather than giving the name. In Saxton’s sixteenth century map‘Tylney’ is shown as the area immediately around the church.

Various other spellings may be found, and other suggestions as to the origin of the name, but we like the above, suggested to us by Norma Virgo. In support of this we know:

The villages and churches were built on the higher ground in the marshland landscape, so Tilney would have been surrounded by marsh, and certainly the Great River Ouse once flowed near the village.

As early as 1065 there was a 'Fredericus de Tilneia' - suggesting the village was so named before the Normans.

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